Water security risk science: local knowledge for participatory resource management

Land degradation is a major cause of Ethiopia’s low and declining natural resource and agricultural productivity, persistent food insecurity, and rural poverty. This study aims to demonstrate water security for the poor can be improved through sustainable land management (SLM) interventions at community or micro-watershed scales.

The focus of the Catalyst project to-date has been on participatory monitoring at community scale as an approach to enhancing climate and hydrological monitoring, particularly for shallow groundwater.

The Accelerated project will build on this research to advance a methodology for monitoring the impacts of watershed management interventions using selected indicators of hydrological performance, and will develop a tool for targeting SLM interventions that increases groundwater recharge. The project will also aim to consolidate community engagement through a gender inclusive approach.

The project is partnered with the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources (MoANR) which is the government agency responsible for implementing the Sustainable Land Management Programme (SLMP) throughout Ethiopia.

This project is one of five Accelerated Projects funded through our Partnership Funding

Community river monitoring in Dangila woreda, Ethopia © D. Walker, Newcastle University

Dates

October 2017 – March 2019

Country

Ethiopia

Organisation

  • Newcastle University
  • International Water Management Institute (IWMI)

John Gowing, Newscastle University

‘This project will improve water security for the poor by empowering people to collectively manage shared shallow groundwater resource at the community level.’

© 2018 REACH